State Codes and Statutes

Statutes > Illinois > Chapter410 > 1578

    (410 ILCS 625/0.01) (from Ch. 56 1/2, par. 330)
    Sec. 0.01. Short title. This Act may be cited as the Food Handling Regulation Enforcement Act.
(Source: P.A. 86‑1324.)

    (410 ILCS 625/1) (from Ch. 56 1/2, par. 331)
    Sec. 1. Any business establishment dealing in the sale of food items which does not comply with existing state laws relating to food handling or does not comply with the health and food handling regulations of any local governmental unit having jurisdiction of such establishment may be enjoined from doing business in the following manner: the Department of Public Health of the State of Illinois or local departments of health may seek an injunction in the circuit court for the county in which such establishment is located. Such injunction, if granted, shall prohibit such business establishment from selling food items until it complies with any applicable state laws or regulations of a local governmental agency. However, no injunction may be sought or granted before July 1, 1980, to enforce any rule or regulation requiring a food service establishment to have one or more persons who are certified in food service sanitation.
    The local department of health shall file a written report with the Illinois Department of Public Health within 10 days after seeking an injunction against a business establishment dealing in the sale of food items.
(Source: P.A. 80‑1295.)

    (410 ILCS 625/2) (from Ch. 56 1/2, par. 332)
    Sec. 2. Nothing in this Act shall be construed as limiting or changing any other penalties which any such business establishment may incur under any other law or local ordinance or resolution.
(Source: Laws 1963, p. 3471.)

    (410 ILCS 625/3) (from Ch. 56 1/2, par. 333)
    Sec. 3. Each food service establishment shall be under the operational supervision of a certified food service sanitation manager in accordance with rules promulgated under this Act.
    By July 1, 1990, the Director of the Department of Public Health in accordance with this Act, shall promulgate rules for the education, examination, and certification of food service establishment managers and instructors of the food service sanitation manager certification education programs. A food service sanitation manager certificate and a food service sanitation manager instructor certificate shall be valid for 5 years, unless revoked by the Department of Public Health, and shall not be transferable from the individual to whom it was issued. Recertification shall be accomplished by presenting evidence of ongoing food safety and food sanitation education or re‑examination, in compliance with rules promulgated by the Director. Existing certificates shall expire on the printed expiration date or 5 years from the effective date of this amendatory Act of 1989.
    Any individual may elect to take the Department of Public Health food service sanitation manager certification examination or take an examination administered by a testing authority previously approved by the Department. The Department shall charge a fee of $35 for each new and renewed food service sanitation manager certificate and $10 for each replacement certificate. All fees collected under this Section shall be deposited into the Food and Drug Safety Fund.
    Any fee received by the Department under this Section that is submitted for the renewal of an expired food service sanitation manager certificate may be returned by the Director after recording the receipt of the fee and the reason for its return.
(Source: P.A. 89‑641, eff. 8‑9‑96.)

    (410 ILCS 625/3.1)
    Sec. 3.1. Potluck events.
    (a) As used in this Section, "potluck event" means an event that meets all of the following conditions:
        (1) People are gathered to share food at the event.
        (2) There is no compensation provided to people for
     bringing food to the event.
        (3) There is no charge for any food or beverage
     provided at the event.
        (4) The event is not conducted for commercial
     purposes.
        (5) It is generally understood by the participants at
     the event that neither the food nor the facilities have been inspected by the State or a local certified public health department.
        (6) The event is not held on public property.
    (b) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, neither the Department of Public Health nor the health department of a unit of local government may regulate the serving of food that is brought to a potluck event sponsored by a group of individuals or a religious, charitable, or nonprofit organization by individuals attending the potluck event for consumption at the potluck event. Individuals who are not members of a group or organization sponsoring a potluck event may attend the potluck event and consume the food at the event. No fee may be charged for admission to a potluck event that is exempt from regulation under this Section, nor may food be sold at a potluck event that is exempt from regulation under this Section. A business establishment dealing in the sale of food items may not sponsor a potluck event. Potluck event food may not be brought into the kitchen of a business establishment dealing in the sale of food items.
(Source: P.A. 93‑1039, eff. 6‑1‑05.)

    (410 ILCS 625/3.2)
    Sec. 3.2. Food banks.
    (a) For purposes of this Section, "food bank" means a public or charitable institution that maintains an established operation involving the provision of food or edible commodities to food pantries, soup kitchens, hunger relief centers, or other feeding programs that, as an integral part of their normal activities, provide meals or food to needy persons.
    (b) All food banks that provide food to feeding programs in Illinois shall provide a list of its member food pantries, soup kitchens, hunger relief centers, and other feeding programs to the State‑certified local public health department or departments having jurisdiction in its service area. Food banks must provide this list to local public health departments annually and the listing shall include the following information about each food pantry, soup kitchen, hunger relief center, and other feeding program:
        (1) agency name;
        (2) type of feeding program;
        (3) address;
        (4) phone number; and
        (5) fax number.
    The intent of having food banks provide this information annually to the local public health department is solely for the purpose of ensuring that food recall alerts and other pertinent information will be communicated to food pantries, soup kitchens, hunger relief centers, and other feeding programs in a timely fashion.
(Source: P.A. 95‑828, eff. 1‑1‑09.)

State Codes and Statutes

Statutes > Illinois > Chapter410 > 1578

    (410 ILCS 625/0.01) (from Ch. 56 1/2, par. 330)
    Sec. 0.01. Short title. This Act may be cited as the Food Handling Regulation Enforcement Act.
(Source: P.A. 86‑1324.)

    (410 ILCS 625/1) (from Ch. 56 1/2, par. 331)
    Sec. 1. Any business establishment dealing in the sale of food items which does not comply with existing state laws relating to food handling or does not comply with the health and food handling regulations of any local governmental unit having jurisdiction of such establishment may be enjoined from doing business in the following manner: the Department of Public Health of the State of Illinois or local departments of health may seek an injunction in the circuit court for the county in which such establishment is located. Such injunction, if granted, shall prohibit such business establishment from selling food items until it complies with any applicable state laws or regulations of a local governmental agency. However, no injunction may be sought or granted before July 1, 1980, to enforce any rule or regulation requiring a food service establishment to have one or more persons who are certified in food service sanitation.
    The local department of health shall file a written report with the Illinois Department of Public Health within 10 days after seeking an injunction against a business establishment dealing in the sale of food items.
(Source: P.A. 80‑1295.)

    (410 ILCS 625/2) (from Ch. 56 1/2, par. 332)
    Sec. 2. Nothing in this Act shall be construed as limiting or changing any other penalties which any such business establishment may incur under any other law or local ordinance or resolution.
(Source: Laws 1963, p. 3471.)

    (410 ILCS 625/3) (from Ch. 56 1/2, par. 333)
    Sec. 3. Each food service establishment shall be under the operational supervision of a certified food service sanitation manager in accordance with rules promulgated under this Act.
    By July 1, 1990, the Director of the Department of Public Health in accordance with this Act, shall promulgate rules for the education, examination, and certification of food service establishment managers and instructors of the food service sanitation manager certification education programs. A food service sanitation manager certificate and a food service sanitation manager instructor certificate shall be valid for 5 years, unless revoked by the Department of Public Health, and shall not be transferable from the individual to whom it was issued. Recertification shall be accomplished by presenting evidence of ongoing food safety and food sanitation education or re‑examination, in compliance with rules promulgated by the Director. Existing certificates shall expire on the printed expiration date or 5 years from the effective date of this amendatory Act of 1989.
    Any individual may elect to take the Department of Public Health food service sanitation manager certification examination or take an examination administered by a testing authority previously approved by the Department. The Department shall charge a fee of $35 for each new and renewed food service sanitation manager certificate and $10 for each replacement certificate. All fees collected under this Section shall be deposited into the Food and Drug Safety Fund.
    Any fee received by the Department under this Section that is submitted for the renewal of an expired food service sanitation manager certificate may be returned by the Director after recording the receipt of the fee and the reason for its return.
(Source: P.A. 89‑641, eff. 8‑9‑96.)

    (410 ILCS 625/3.1)
    Sec. 3.1. Potluck events.
    (a) As used in this Section, "potluck event" means an event that meets all of the following conditions:
        (1) People are gathered to share food at the event.
        (2) There is no compensation provided to people for
     bringing food to the event.
        (3) There is no charge for any food or beverage
     provided at the event.
        (4) The event is not conducted for commercial
     purposes.
        (5) It is generally understood by the participants at
     the event that neither the food nor the facilities have been inspected by the State or a local certified public health department.
        (6) The event is not held on public property.
    (b) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, neither the Department of Public Health nor the health department of a unit of local government may regulate the serving of food that is brought to a potluck event sponsored by a group of individuals or a religious, charitable, or nonprofit organization by individuals attending the potluck event for consumption at the potluck event. Individuals who are not members of a group or organization sponsoring a potluck event may attend the potluck event and consume the food at the event. No fee may be charged for admission to a potluck event that is exempt from regulation under this Section, nor may food be sold at a potluck event that is exempt from regulation under this Section. A business establishment dealing in the sale of food items may not sponsor a potluck event. Potluck event food may not be brought into the kitchen of a business establishment dealing in the sale of food items.
(Source: P.A. 93‑1039, eff. 6‑1‑05.)

    (410 ILCS 625/3.2)
    Sec. 3.2. Food banks.
    (a) For purposes of this Section, "food bank" means a public or charitable institution that maintains an established operation involving the provision of food or edible commodities to food pantries, soup kitchens, hunger relief centers, or other feeding programs that, as an integral part of their normal activities, provide meals or food to needy persons.
    (b) All food banks that provide food to feeding programs in Illinois shall provide a list of its member food pantries, soup kitchens, hunger relief centers, and other feeding programs to the State‑certified local public health department or departments having jurisdiction in its service area. Food banks must provide this list to local public health departments annually and the listing shall include the following information about each food pantry, soup kitchen, hunger relief center, and other feeding program:
        (1) agency name;
        (2) type of feeding program;
        (3) address;
        (4) phone number; and
        (5) fax number.
    The intent of having food banks provide this information annually to the local public health department is solely for the purpose of ensuring that food recall alerts and other pertinent information will be communicated to food pantries, soup kitchens, hunger relief centers, and other feeding programs in a timely fashion.
(Source: P.A. 95‑828, eff. 1‑1‑09.)

State Codes and Statutes

State Codes and Statutes

Statutes > Illinois > Chapter410 > 1578

    (410 ILCS 625/0.01) (from Ch. 56 1/2, par. 330)
    Sec. 0.01. Short title. This Act may be cited as the Food Handling Regulation Enforcement Act.
(Source: P.A. 86‑1324.)

    (410 ILCS 625/1) (from Ch. 56 1/2, par. 331)
    Sec. 1. Any business establishment dealing in the sale of food items which does not comply with existing state laws relating to food handling or does not comply with the health and food handling regulations of any local governmental unit having jurisdiction of such establishment may be enjoined from doing business in the following manner: the Department of Public Health of the State of Illinois or local departments of health may seek an injunction in the circuit court for the county in which such establishment is located. Such injunction, if granted, shall prohibit such business establishment from selling food items until it complies with any applicable state laws or regulations of a local governmental agency. However, no injunction may be sought or granted before July 1, 1980, to enforce any rule or regulation requiring a food service establishment to have one or more persons who are certified in food service sanitation.
    The local department of health shall file a written report with the Illinois Department of Public Health within 10 days after seeking an injunction against a business establishment dealing in the sale of food items.
(Source: P.A. 80‑1295.)

    (410 ILCS 625/2) (from Ch. 56 1/2, par. 332)
    Sec. 2. Nothing in this Act shall be construed as limiting or changing any other penalties which any such business establishment may incur under any other law or local ordinance or resolution.
(Source: Laws 1963, p. 3471.)

    (410 ILCS 625/3) (from Ch. 56 1/2, par. 333)
    Sec. 3. Each food service establishment shall be under the operational supervision of a certified food service sanitation manager in accordance with rules promulgated under this Act.
    By July 1, 1990, the Director of the Department of Public Health in accordance with this Act, shall promulgate rules for the education, examination, and certification of food service establishment managers and instructors of the food service sanitation manager certification education programs. A food service sanitation manager certificate and a food service sanitation manager instructor certificate shall be valid for 5 years, unless revoked by the Department of Public Health, and shall not be transferable from the individual to whom it was issued. Recertification shall be accomplished by presenting evidence of ongoing food safety and food sanitation education or re‑examination, in compliance with rules promulgated by the Director. Existing certificates shall expire on the printed expiration date or 5 years from the effective date of this amendatory Act of 1989.
    Any individual may elect to take the Department of Public Health food service sanitation manager certification examination or take an examination administered by a testing authority previously approved by the Department. The Department shall charge a fee of $35 for each new and renewed food service sanitation manager certificate and $10 for each replacement certificate. All fees collected under this Section shall be deposited into the Food and Drug Safety Fund.
    Any fee received by the Department under this Section that is submitted for the renewal of an expired food service sanitation manager certificate may be returned by the Director after recording the receipt of the fee and the reason for its return.
(Source: P.A. 89‑641, eff. 8‑9‑96.)

    (410 ILCS 625/3.1)
    Sec. 3.1. Potluck events.
    (a) As used in this Section, "potluck event" means an event that meets all of the following conditions:
        (1) People are gathered to share food at the event.
        (2) There is no compensation provided to people for
     bringing food to the event.
        (3) There is no charge for any food or beverage
     provided at the event.
        (4) The event is not conducted for commercial
     purposes.
        (5) It is generally understood by the participants at
     the event that neither the food nor the facilities have been inspected by the State or a local certified public health department.
        (6) The event is not held on public property.
    (b) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, neither the Department of Public Health nor the health department of a unit of local government may regulate the serving of food that is brought to a potluck event sponsored by a group of individuals or a religious, charitable, or nonprofit organization by individuals attending the potluck event for consumption at the potluck event. Individuals who are not members of a group or organization sponsoring a potluck event may attend the potluck event and consume the food at the event. No fee may be charged for admission to a potluck event that is exempt from regulation under this Section, nor may food be sold at a potluck event that is exempt from regulation under this Section. A business establishment dealing in the sale of food items may not sponsor a potluck event. Potluck event food may not be brought into the kitchen of a business establishment dealing in the sale of food items.
(Source: P.A. 93‑1039, eff. 6‑1‑05.)

    (410 ILCS 625/3.2)
    Sec. 3.2. Food banks.
    (a) For purposes of this Section, "food bank" means a public or charitable institution that maintains an established operation involving the provision of food or edible commodities to food pantries, soup kitchens, hunger relief centers, or other feeding programs that, as an integral part of their normal activities, provide meals or food to needy persons.
    (b) All food banks that provide food to feeding programs in Illinois shall provide a list of its member food pantries, soup kitchens, hunger relief centers, and other feeding programs to the State‑certified local public health department or departments having jurisdiction in its service area. Food banks must provide this list to local public health departments annually and the listing shall include the following information about each food pantry, soup kitchen, hunger relief center, and other feeding program:
        (1) agency name;
        (2) type of feeding program;
        (3) address;
        (4) phone number; and
        (5) fax number.
    The intent of having food banks provide this information annually to the local public health department is solely for the purpose of ensuring that food recall alerts and other pertinent information will be communicated to food pantries, soup kitchens, hunger relief centers, and other feeding programs in a timely fashion.
(Source: P.A. 95‑828, eff. 1‑1‑09.)

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