State Codes and Statutes

State Codes and Statutes

Statutes > Nebraska > Chapter42 > 42-101

42-101. Marriage a civil contract.In law, marriage is considered a civil contract, to which the consent of the parties capable of contracting is essential. SourceR.S.1866, c. 34, § 1, p. 254; R.S.1913, § 1540; C.S.1922, § 1489; C.S.1929, § 42-101; R.S.1943, § 42-101. Cross ReferencesAgreements based on consideration of marriage, must be written, see section 36-202.Child whose parents marry is legitimate, see section 43-1406. Annotations1. Nature of contract2. Agreement of parties3. Validity of marriage4. Common-law marriage5. Miscellaneous1. Nature of contractAlthough this section denotes marriage as a "civil contract," persons entering into matrimony establish a social status, not a contractual relation. Edmunds v. Edwards, 205 Neb. 255, 287 N.W.2d 420 (1980).Where consent is obtained by fraud, marriage may be annulled. Zutavern v. Zutavern, 155 Neb. 395, 52 N.W.2d 254 (1952).Marriage is a civil contract which, if procured by fraud, may be set aside. Hudson v. Hudson, 151 Neb. 210, 36 N.W.2d 851 (1949).State is always a party. Willits v. Willits, 76 Neb. 228, 107 N.W. 379 (1906).Consent of state is necessary. Eaton v. Eaton, 66 Neb. 676, 92 N.W. 995 (1902).Marriage is a social status, and only in a limited sense is the relation contractual. University of Michigan v. McGuckin, 64 Neb. 300, 89 N.W. 778 (1902).2. Agreement of partiesConsent of parties mentally competent is required. Kutch v. Kutch, 88 Neb. 114, 129 N.W. 169 (1910).Mental weakness alone does not avoid contract. Aldrich v. Steen, 71 Neb. 33, 98 N.W. 445 (1904).3. Validity of marriageIt is not a ground for annulment that license was wrongfully obtained where parties are competent and marriage is fully consummated. Baker v. Baker, 112 Neb. 738, 200 N.W. 1003 (1924).Marriages valid in Indian tribe under Indian customs, are valid here. Ortley v. Ross, 78 Neb. 339, 110 N.W. 982 (1907).Marriage is valid where minds of competent parties meet. University of Michigan v. McGuckin, 62 Neb. 489, 87 N.W. 180 (1901).Where marriage is celebrated in good faith, it is binding though parties had agreed it should not be. Hills v. State, 61 Neb. 589, 85 N.W. 836 (1901).4. Common-law marriageSince 1923, common-law marriages cannot be made in this state. Collins v. Hoag & Rollins, 122 Neb. 805, 241 N.W. 766 (1932), reversing 121 Neb. 716, 238 N.W. 351 (1931).5. MiscellaneousAgreements to separate are against public policy. Brun v. Brun, 64 Neb. 782, 90 N.W. 860 (1902).